GenCon 2016 Recap

It’s hard to believe it’s already been several weeks since GenCon. The show itself was a wonderful whirlwind, and I’ve been just as busy after returning home. I spent my time at the Steamforged Games booth this year chatting with convention attendees and doing preview demos of Shadow Games and Dark Souls: the Board Game.

Shadow Games was my first contract project for Steamforged Games, and I’m thrilled to say that it’s now at the printer to be releasing shortly. Shadow Games is a card game with bluffing elements, filled with opportunities to trick your friends or catch them in their lies. More information will be available as we get closer to the release date, but Team Covenant made a great video introducing Shadow Games to pique your interest.

After our collaboration on Shadow Games went so well, Steamforged Games reached out to me to help develop Dark Souls: the Board Game. Needless to say, I was very excited to be part of this record-breaking board game. The gameplay has evolved a great deal since the Kickstarter campaign, and we rolled out the updated boss fight demo experience at GenCon.

It’s hard for me to put the experience of demoing Dark Souls: the Board Game at GenCon into words. I’ve demoed many games at many conventions for many years, but I’ve never demoed to crowds before. GenCon attendees packed around the demo table, several rows deep where space would allow. The demos themselves were quite interactive with onlookers calling out questions or letting out huge cheers (or groans) at a roll of the dice. We also set up demos for several YouTube channels and blogs. Here are the ones I was able to find. If you also created a Dark Souls: the Board Game video or blog, let me know, and I’ll happily add you to the list.

YTN Episode 018

The 18th Episode of Your Turn Next is now available!

This episode, we introduce our (temporary) new format of being a local only podcast due to recent trouble with Skype. In the first segment, Jess talks about her recent gaming experiences, and I give a Clockwork Phoenix update.

The second segment covers our featured games, and this episode we feature:

In our topic segment this episode, we chat about play-and-keep events at conventions. More and more conventions seem to have play-and-keep events these days. They’re a great way to get in more board games at a convention and maybe even get some to take home with you.

YTN_AvatarWe’d love to hear from you! Let us know in the comments or via email if you have any topics, questions, or ideas you’d like us to discuss in a future podcast.

The email is: contact@clockworkphoenixgames.com

YTN Episode 017

The 17th Episode of Your Turn Next is now available!

This episode, Ryan and I are joined by Seppy from Fight in a Box games. We kick things off as usual with a brief discussion of the games we’ve been playing, miniatures we’ve been painting, and the games we can’t wait to play next.

The second segment covers our featured games, and this episode we feature:

Our topic segment for the episode looks at coming up with ideas for games versus executing those ideas. We talk about how important (and difficult) a successful execution can be and close the episode with a brilliant new game idea from each of our podcasters.

YTN_AvatarWe’d love to hear from you! Let us know in the comments or via email if you have any topics, questions, or ideas you’d like us to discuss in a future podcast.

The email is: contact@clockworkphoenixgames.com

YTN Episode 016

The 16th Episode of Your Turn Next is now available!

Wow, the last few weeks have simply flown by. I’ve been busy with AdeptiCon 2016 and with some game development work, so I’m a little later than I meant to be, but I hope you enjoy this new episode of Your Turn Next. This episode, Ryan and I are joined by Tony, and we kick things off as usual with a brief discussion of what we’ve been up to in the world of gaming.

The second segment covers our featured games, and this episode we feature:

Our topic segment for the episode features free rules. We discuss downloadable and print-n-play rules for board games and card games, and we also discuss downloadable rulebooks and stat cards for hobby miniatures games.

YTN_AvatarWe’d love to hear from you! Let us know in the comments or via email if you have any topics, questions, or ideas you’d like us to discuss in a future podcast.

The email is: contact@clockworkphoenixgames.com

YTN Episode 015

The 15th Episode of Your Turn Next is now available!

First, I want to say a big “Thanks!” to our community for making the last podcast our most downloaded show thus far by leaps and bounds. We’ll definitely be sticking to the new format. Be sure to tell us what aspects of the show you particularly like, and we’ll try to focus on similar topics in the future. This episode, Ryan and I are joined by Reese, and we kick things off with a brief discussion of what we’ve been up to lately game-wise.

The second segment covers our featured games, and this episode we feature:

Our topic segment for the episode goes a little bit long as we talk about rebooting franchises, adapting them to new media, and our thoughts on reboots that have been handled successfully and… less than successfully.

YTN_AvatarWe’d love to hear from you! Let us know in the comments or via email if you have any topics, questions, or ideas you’d like us to discuss in a future podcast.

The email is: contact@clockworkphoenixgames.com

YTN Episode 013

The 13th Episode of Your Turn Next is now available!

We start out this episode with the usual discussion of what we’ve been up to lately gaming-wise and then… well… we discuss more of what we’ve been up to lately. It’s just a good old fashioned chat between gamers covering their ideas about different games and about having fun with the gaming hobby. We hope you enjoy it.

Let us know in the comments or via email if you have any topics, questions, or ideas you’d like us to discuss in a future podcast. The email address is: contact@clockworkphoenixgames.com

And if you’re looking for links to some of the things we discussed this episode, here’s where to find more about:

The 5 Stages of Prototypes

During one of the panels at OrcaCon last weekend, we discussed the various stages of playtesting. It was an interesting discussion, but as I thought back on the panel later, I realized that there was an element of the discussion we didn’t talk about, and that’s the stages of game prototypes, a very important consideration when talking about playtesting games!

Different game developers approach prototyping differently, and there are plenty of successful methods of prototyping rather than clear “right” and “wrong” approaches. I will caution would-be game developers against paying to get their game created by an on-demand printer too early in the process, however. I’ve had more than one game developer tell me they wish they waited another iteration (or five) before spending money on on-demand game printing.

In my book, the first game prototype is the mechanics test. At the earliest stages of game design, you don’t even know if you’ve got a functional idea much less a fun idea, so you don’t want to spend hours upon hours making an awesome prototype of something that doesn’t work. So grab a marker and some card stock and figure out if you’ve got something that works. It doesn’t have to be pretty. It’s just a quick and dirty test of the new game mechanic in your game. I’ve subjected my wife, Jess, to some truly ugly prototypes to test mechanics for a new game idea. You’ll typically know very quickly if you’re on an interesting track or should just scrap the idea and go with something else.

The second game prototype is the proof of concept version. If you’re working towards a specific goal rather than sandboxing it, you might start here instead of starting with your innovative game mechanics. The proof of concept prototype helps determine if your vision for the game as a whole is going to hold up. You’ve got some cool new mechanics, and you’ve got foundational mechanics like rolling dice or drawing cards, but how does it all come together? It might take several iterations, but the proof of concept prototypes will help you see what needs to change and how. Your final proof of concept prototype still won’t be pretty, but it will be a true and playable game.

Stages three and four will look very similar physically and could arguably be considered a single step. Since I’m writing this blog, however, I’m calling step three the gameplay prototype. In this stage, you’re definitely moving from game design (the big picture) into game development (the detail work). By means of example, you might take the two character decks from your proof of concept game and turn them into ten different character decks. You’ll expand upon your core ideas to add more diverse gameplay and more unique player choices. You’ll also start iterating on the appearance of your game, making the playtest components easier to read and understand even though they still aren’t as pretty as they will be in the final retail version of the game.

Stage four is the game balance prototype stage. At some point, you’ll need to stop adding new content and start focusing on balancing the content you have, the content that will be part of the final game. This stage could have many, many iterations, and it’s full of analysis, playtesting, and revisions. At times, it can be discouraging because the forward momentum is less visible than other stages, but it’s a crucial part of the process. During this stage, you’ll probably also start receiving final artwork for aspects of the game, which can build even more excitement for the final prototype.

The fifth and final stage is the game mockup. You might not have the exact card stock for the final game, and there might be a few missing illustrations or icons, but the game mockup is essentially your finished game. You won’t want to make big changes at this point in the process, but you shouldn’t skip the game mockup either. It could show that certain icons or colors are difficult to differentiate or that certain fonts are difficult to read. Stages one and two helped with the game’s design, three and four were the core of the game’s development, but stage five is as much a part of game production as it is game design and development.

So that’s how I see the five stages of game prototyping. Feel free to comment if you agree or disagree with these thoughts or if you have game prototyping ideas of your own you’d like to share. Thanks!